Timberyard, Edinburgh, 9/20/17

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building

Timberyard has a rustic feel with well spaced, good-sized wood planked tables, brick walls and candles everywhere.  Small lights hang from the ceiling but it a fairly low light level which makes the photos a bit grainy since I won’t use flash.  A wood-stove and seating area are in the middle of the long room.  The background music is eclectic in the dining room and rain sounds accompany you in the bathroom.  The building had been an actual lumberyard and hardware store up to 5 years ago, thus the name Timberyard.  Service is friendly but not overly engaging.  However the pacing was quite nice.  They offer 3 different tasting menus, 4, 6 and 8 courses with optional drink pairings. Portion sizes are well controlled so the 8 is not too much food.  

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entrance
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Frankie pointed out the sample menu
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entry
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looking toward the entrance
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interior
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interior
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seating by fireplace
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bar
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Frankie was amazed at all the candles
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table set up
that night's menu
that night’s menu

 

As we looked over the options we were brought nice crusty rye bread, butter, mild dill pickle and piece of cured meat.  All were tasty.

Bread, butter and snacks
Bread, butter and snacks
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wine
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wine

 

A couple amuse bouche start the meal.  First was a pickled, then barbecued carrot and a carrot top emulsion with hazelnut pesto on a cracker.  The carrots were really smoky and crisp and the emulsion was equally tasty and savory.  Simple but very good.

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Pickled and barbecued carrots with carrot top emulsion
closer carrot top emulsion
closer carrot top emulsion
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Frankie found a lounge area to relax

 

Smoked eel was topped with sweet beet root and covered with thin sweet slices of beet.  The eel was delicious and mixed well with the beet.

smoked eel and beetroot
smoked eel and beetroot
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underneath

 

The tasting started with cured scallop served with kohlrabi, pine, horseradish and sorrel.  The scallop was raw with an almost nutty flavor.  The pine was the flavoring in the broth and thankfully not too strong which worked great with the sweet and delicious scallop.

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cured scallop with kohlrabi, pine, horseradish, sorrel
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closer
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Frankie liked the stone walls in the bathroom

 

Mackerel with salt gooseberry, cucumber and watercress was next.  The mackerel had been lightly seared and the cucumbers cut into balls.  The nice mackerel was not overpowering probably because it was super fresh and had been cooked just enough to give that slight stick that you often get with good salmon.  All the ingredients worked really well together to produce a very good course.

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Mackerel, salt gooseberry, cucumber, watercress
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closer

 

Octopus was served with burnt apple sauce, fennel and herbs. The apple went really well with the octopus but some of the herbs were overpowering.  A bit of dill worked best in my opinion.

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Octopus, burnt apple, fennel, herbs
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closer
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Frankie liked using a log as a table

 

Partridge was served with Jerusalem artichoke, hen of the woods mushroom and pear.  The partridge was tender and nicely cooked white meat and great with the delicious mushroom.  The artichoke seemed to have been peeled and sliced ultra thin.  A small piece of the liver was also on the plate and it was juicy and delicious.   A wonderful savory sauce added even more to this tasty plate.

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Partridge, Jerusalem artichoke, hen of the woods, pear
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closer

 

Hake was paired with razor clams, seaweed butter,  salsify and smoked purée of potato.  The rubbery clams paired nicely with the sprinkling of herbs and the hake was perfectly cooked.  Each ingredient on the plate was excellent alone but also mixed well with all the others.

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hake, razor clams, seaweed butter, salsify
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closer
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Frankie practiced her moves on an old pommel horse

 

Mallard was served with squash, black garlic, endive and truffle.  The duck was cooked nicely rare on top of a black garlic – truffle sauce mixed with some squash juice.  A piece of the heart was chewy goodness and a nice surprise.  Lots of flavors here and tasty bites, but in this case they were all best when eaten in combination.

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Mallard, squash, black garlic, endive, truffle
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closer

 

A palate cleanser was an extra.  It was made of sheep’s milk sorbet with mint.  The very creamy sorbet was refreshingly wonderful and the mint was a tasty addition.

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Sheep’s milk sorbet with mint
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closer
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Frankie watched as the candles burned down

 

Meadowsweet was malted caramel with milk foam and hazelnuts. The creamy ice cream dusted with malt and hazelnuts was yummy deliciousness.  It was a perfect amount of sweetness.

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Meadowsweet, hazelnut, malt
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closer

 

Fig leaf ice cream with damson, plum and goats milk yoghurt was the last course.  It was very good but had a few too many ingredients for my tastes.  It did have a crumble of something on the plate but textural contrast was lacking here.

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Fig leaf, damson, plum, goats yoghurt
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little closer
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Frankie climbed the log pile

 

2 thoughts on “Timberyard, Edinburgh, 9/20/17

  1. Helen, the blog on this restaurant is great! I have never eaten hardly ANY of those foods! The place was lovely, love the fireplace seatings and the logs Frankie was on! Bread looked great, I have had rye bread before, lol! What is amuse bouche? I need an education on this food! I have never tasted eel! The mackerel and partridge look great, wish I COULD drink red wine without getting a headache! You two are definitely food connoisseurs! Loved the blog and the pictures and the pictures of the food, especially those I have never had! Great job, Helen!

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  2. Thanks Dana! It was a fun place. Amuse bouche is a French term literally meaning “mouth amuser” and it is used for small treats given to the diner before the meal that are not on the menu. They are gifts from the kitchen and usually small bites that showcase a style of the chef.

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