Osteria Boccadoro, Venice, 4/12/17

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Exterior

After you enter the bar area Boccadoro splits into 2 rooms, one to either side and one really small room separated by a beautiful glass sculpture.   Patio seating is available if weather permits.  The lighting is low with soft jazz music in the background.  An elegant setting, there is lots of art on the walls, exposed beams in the ceiling and pretty tile on the floor.  It is old school with ladies menus having no prices. The staff is friendly and very helpful. Our waiter, Simone, easily suggested what we should order and we were wise to follow his plan.  It turns out he is the son of Chef Luciano Orlandi, so he really had the inside track.  

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Interior
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interior
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interior
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interior
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Frankie admired the glass sculpture
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menu cover
restaurant info
restaurant info
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drink menu
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menu 1
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menu 2
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menu 3
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menu 4
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menu 5
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menu 6

 

While we looked over the large menu we tried their version of spritz, the drink of Venice, and it very tasty.

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Frankie admired the color of the spritz
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table set up

 

Our first dish was to split a plate of raw local seafood.   It included wild sea bream with honey and strawberries, scampi and tuna tartar.  The tuna tartar was very nice as were the scampi.  However the sea bream was outstanding, mixed with the honey, pomegranate seeds, greens and strawberries, it was a wonderful and interesting combination. A bit of balsamic was along the side for accent as wanted.  A good plate!

raw plate
antipasto platter for 2
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tuna tartar
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scampi
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Sea bream with honey and strawberries
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Frankie like the Venetian glasses

 

They also brought a plate of 3 types of breads which were a bit dry and not really needed.

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breads
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wine front
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wine back
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Frankie liked the named glasses

 

Next was a platter of cooked seafoods, including spider crab, anchovy,  shrimp, baby octopus, squid roe, welks, canoce (Mantis shrimp) and polenta with shrimp.  All were wonderfully fresh and perfectly cooked.  The squid roe, which are the white discs, were new to me and had a totally mild, appealing taste.  Olive oil was generously dotted on the plate to add even more flavor to the mild tastes.  It was a great variety of flavors and textures and a really nice version of a mixed platter of freshness.

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cooked mixed plate
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Spider crab and anchovy
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shrimp and squid roe
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octopus
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Welks, Mantis shrimp, polenta with shrimp
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Frankie liked the toilet paper basket

 

The Tagliolini ‘of the day’ was pasta with shrimp with a broccoli pesto and chunks of perfectly cooked shrimp.  The pasta was amazing as were the shrimp. The sauce was a unique and wonderful and the serving was just the right amount.

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tagliolini dello chef
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closer
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Simone Orlandi and Frankie

 

We finished with John Dory fillets with a brodo sauce (made from fish stock).  They were served with roasted potatoes, endive (chicory), eggplant and asparagus.  All the vegetables were nicely fresh and tasty and the fish had not a hint of dryness.  Everything was mildly seasoned  yet incredibly tasty.  This simple plate was fantastic.

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Filetto di coda misto di verdure – John Dory fillet with vegetables
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potatoes and endive
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John Dory fillets
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eggplant and asparagus
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Frankie thought it was a success

 

We decided to make grappa our dessert and the waiter had a ritual to make it really outstanding.  He fills brandy snifter with hot water, empties them and then pours in the grappa.  The aroma is amazing with this simple trick. You don’t even need to drink any the first couple tips of the glass.  I may have to try this at home.

dessert menu
dessert menu
coffee menu
dessert coffee
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digestives
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Grappa menu
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Frankie loves grappa
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Grappa fumes made Frankie swoon
Chef Luciano Orlandi
Chef Luciano Orlandi and Frankie

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